Stuff No One Tells You About Toddlers

Dawn Dais, The Sh!t No One Tells You About Toddlers.
Topic:
A guide to surviving the toddler years
Issues: Restaurants are battle zones: don’t even bother trying to feed a toddler; potty training; taking the fun out of vacations; when you’re not the favorite parent.

Creating a Beautiful Mess + Surviving the Toddler Years

Ann Gadzikowski, author of Creating a Beautiful Mess.
Topic:
Essential play experiences for a joyous childhood.
Issues: Playing with blocks; turn-taking games; pretend and make believe; the joys of messes; finding and collecting; and more.

Dawn Dais, The Sh!t No One Tells You About Toddlers.
Topic:
A guide to surviving the toddler years
Issues: Restaurants are battle zones: don’t even bother trying to feed a toddler; potty training; taking the fun out of vacations; when you’re not the favorite parent.

Biting and Hitting the Hand that Feeds

biting teeth

Photo credit: gigabiting.com

Dear Mr. Dad: Our son just turned one and, almost like flipping a switch, he went from the sweetest, happiest little guy to smacking and biting. It’s bad enough when it happens at home, but my husband and I are beyond embarrassed when he attacks friends or strangers. Is it normal for babies to turn mean like this? Normal or not, how can we get it to stop?

A: No one knows exactly why, but right around their first birthday, most babies go through a stage that involves hitting and/or biting everything and everyone in sight. So, yes, biting and hitting are normal, and it’s unlikely that he’s “turning mean.” However, as you said, whether it’s normal or not, this behavior needs to stop. Before you can do anything about the behavior, though, you need to figure out what’s behind it.

According to child development experts, there are lots of possible explanations. Your baby may be hitting or biting because: [Read more…]

Healthy Eating Tips for Every Age and Stage of Development

mrdad - good eating habits

Dads, listen up: Child obesity is out of control. Don’t let your child fall victim to this epidemic that affects nearly one in three children in America. What your children put in their bodies aids their mental and physical development. Begin feeding your kids nutritious food from day one and adjust to their needs during different life stages. Here are some healthy eating tips to implement in every stage of your child’s life.

Newborns

Breast milk is the best food for babies. It provides all the beneficial nutrients, according to the American Association of Pediatrics, which recommends exclusive breastfeeding until six months and a combination of breast milk and iron-rich complementary foods thereafter.

Not only does breastfeeding promote a deeper connection with between mom and baby, breast milk aids in protection from respiratory illnesses, infections, stomach problems, skin irritations and allergies.

New fathers can build their bond with baby by feeding breast milk from a bottle after mom’s milk supply is established (at about two to four weeks). Here’s the best approach:

[Read more…]

How Toddlers Thrive


Tovah Klein, author of How Toddlers Thrive.
Topic: What parents can do for kids ages 2-5 to plant the seeds of lifelong success.
Issues: Who are toddlers? why they do the things they do; teaching self-regulation; why they pull you close, then push you away; the importance of learning to think like a toddler; solutions for common toddler issues like tantrums, toilet training; sleep; sharing, and playing.

Toddlers on Technology + Raise the Child You’ve Got


Patti Wollman Summers, co-author of Toddlers on Technology.
Topic:
Helping parents grab the reins of their digitod’s digital technology.
Issues: Secrets to managing touchscreens in a toddler’s life; choosing apps in tandem with your child’s learning style; creating balance between screen time and real-life activities; the latest research on the effects of screen time on young children’s brains.


Nancy Rose, author of Raise the Child You’ve Got, Not the One You Want.
Topic:
Why everyone thrives when parents lead with acceptance
Issues: Understanding and accepting your child’s core traits; What you can and can’t change about your child; the power of acceptance; building a healthy parent-child connection; raising your children to be the best, happiest selves.