Building Children’s Mental Toughness + Living with a SEAL

Rob Bell, coauthor of Don’t “Should” on Your Kids.
Topic:
Building your children’s mental toughness.
Issues: Why “sports is 90% mental” is 100% wrong; when and how to talk to your kids about their sports performance; helping kids find their passions in sports; when to push and when to back off.

Jesse Itzler, author of Living with a SEAL.
Topic:
31 days training with the toughest man on the planet
Issues: An inspiring, hilarious story of friendship, discovery, fitness, muscle soreness, pushing limits, and the benefits of stepping out of your comfort zone.

Activities and Answers for Grandparents Today

Jan Eby, Laurie Mobilio, Lynn Noel, and Cindy Summers, coauthors of The Grammie Guide.
Topic
: Activities and answers for grandparents today.
Issues: Indoor and outdoor activities; reminders on child-development ages and stages; safety guidelines; grandparenting at a distance; music, books, and art for young children; and more.

The Amazing Story of Taylor Wilson


Tom Clynes, author of The Boy Who Played with Fusion.
Topic:
Extreme science, extreme parenting, and how to make a star
Issues: The amazing story of Taylor Wilson, an American teenager who became the youngest personever to build a working nuclear fusion reactor; the equally amazing choices Taylor’s parents made to fully support his intellectual passions; the social challenges of being off-the-charts brilliant.

Motherhood, Fatherhood, and the Changing Landscape of Parenthood

Heather Flett, coauthor of The Rookie Mom’s Handbook.
Topic:
Motherhood, fatherhood, the changing landscape of parenthood.
Issues: How motherhood has changed over the last 10 years; the mom blogging community; resources for new moms; the importance of letting the dad do things his way; the role of social media in creating communities of moms.

When Kids Call the Shots + Rookie Moms


Sean Grover, author of When Kids Call the Shots.
Topic:
How to seize control from your darling bully and enjoy being a parent again.
Issues: Understanding the root causes of your child’s bossy behavior; how your own insecurities and history have shaped your parenting choices; types of parents who are more susceptible to being bullied by their kids; three most common bullying styles that kids use–and strategies you can use to restore your leadership.

Heather Flett, coauthor of The Rookie Mom’s Handbook.
Topic:
Motherhood, fatherhood, the changing landscape of parenthood.
Issues: How motherhood has changed over the last 10 years; the mom blogging community; resources for new moms; the importance of letting the dad do things his way; the role of social media in creating communities of moms.

Useful Advice for Teaching Kids to Ride a Bike

A guest post by Leona S. Green

Riding a bicycle is one of the biggest milestones that a kid can ever achieve. It is like a rite of passage that shows the young ones the joys, risks, and thrills, of being independent. If you were a very active kid, you can still probably remember the first time that you pedaled your two-wheeled vehicle. And now that you have your own children, you probably want to share with them the happiness that you felt when you managed to maneuver your ride and went through daring adventures with your friends.
For older people, riding a bike can be as easy as breathing. But for the little ones, balancing on their bicycles can be a little bit challenging. That’s the reason why parents need to be resourceful and patient with teaching them how to balance and pedal their ride. To help you out, check out this post and discover the most effective ways for teaching your kids how to ride a bicycle and love the experience.
1. Choosing their Ride
Of course, it always starts with choosing their two-wheel ride. Unlike clothes, it is highly recommended that you avoid buying bmx bicycles that are too big for them. They won’t grow into their over sized bikes, and it will slow down their development rather than hasten it.
To check if it’s the correct fit, make sure that they can still stand on the top tube while keeping their feet on the ground. In addition he should also feel comfortable while sitting on it.
2. Safety first
To lessen your worries about any potential risks, let him wear durable bile helmet that meets safety standards. In addition, consider buying gloves, shin guards, or knee pads.
When you’re practicing how to ride, make sure that you choose an area where there’s not too much traffic. The road should also be flat and paved. You can start in your front yard, driveway, or a vacant parking lot.
3. Run alongside your kid
Work with your kid by running alongside him while controlling the steering. Once he gets the hang of it, gently hold your son’s shoulders and allow him to steer.
4. Teach them how to use the brake
Sometimes, we get so excited about teaching them how to pedal that we forget one of the most vital steps in cycling – learning how to use the brake. Teach the young ones how to do emergency stops. Regularly perform these stops until hitting the brake becomes second nature to them. Teach them about braking gradually, and how to use the rear and front brakes.
Got any other tips to your fellow parents? Feel free to share them in the comments section!