Kids and Money + Making Fiends + Drug-Free Kid

[amazon asin=1607744082&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Joline Godfrey, author of Raising Financially Fit Kids.
Topic:
A pioneer in increasing children’s financial literacy talks about thriving in a post-Madoff, post-subprime meltdown world.
Issues: Five financial development stages; essential skills children (of all ages) need to learn; observing your children’s money style and helping kids differentiate between wants and needs; connecting goals and savings; fostering an entrepreneurial spirit.

[amazon asin=0738213233&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Elizabeth Hartley Brewer, author of Making Friends
Topic:
A guide to understanding and nurturing your child’s friendships
Issues: Should you worry when your child’s imaginary friend sticks around past preschool? How do boys’ and girls’ friendships differ? What do kids really value in a friendship? What should you do if you don’t like one of your child’s friends?

[amazon asin=B003E7ET44&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Joseph Califano, author of How to Raise a Drug-Free Kid.
Topic:
The straight dope for parents
Issues: When and how to talk to your kids about drugs and alcohol; how to respond when your kid asks, “Did you do drugs?”; how to know when your child is most at risk; how to prepare your teen for the freedoms and perils of college

Reinventing Your Shopping Strategy + Best American Products for Kids + Narcissism Epidemic

[amazon asin=080072206X&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Kasey Knight Trenum, author of Couponing for the Rest of Us.
Topic
: A not-so-extreme guide to saving more.
Issues: Where to find coupons for what your family eats; how to reinvent your shopping strategy, how to make grocery shopping less stressful–and even fun.

[amazon asin=B005IUY2RY&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Bruce Wolk, author of Made Here, Baby!
Topic:
Finding the best American-made products for kids
Issues: Family businesses, green companies, minority- and women-owned businesses; how small manufacturers get distribution; why buying American products can help assure us of quality and safety.

[amazon asin=1416575995&template=thumbleft&chan=default]Jean Twenge, author of The Narcissism Epidemic.
Topic:
Living in the age of entitlement
Issues: The characteristics of narcissism; how narcissistic values such as materialism, vanity, and entitlement have spread to the culture at large; the real costs of narcissism in the workplace, relationships, school, and everywhere else.

Save Time and Money + Be a Parent not a Friend + From Parenting Chaos to Harmony

[amazon asin=0800721446&template=thumbnail&chan=default]Mary Hunt, author of Cheaper, Better, Faster
Topic:
The best advice you’ve ever heard to save time and money every day.
Issues: How to make everyday life less hectic and more enjoyable.

[amazon asin=0785228101&template=thumbnail&chan=default]E.D. Hill, author of I’m Not Your Friend, I’m Your Parent
Topic:
Helping your children set the boundaries they need…and really want
Issues: Why manners is job one and the concept of  “dressing for success” is not dead.

[amazon asin=0415989345&template=thumbnail&chan=default]Theresa Kellam, author of The Parent Survival Guide
Topic:
From chaos to harmony in ten weeks or less.
Issues: Making a loving connection, finding windows into your child’s inner world, speaking the language of play, promoting your child’s emotional maturity.

Fighting about Money Could Cost Your Kids Plenty

When mom and dad fight about money, their college-aged students are more likely to rack up credit card debt. So says Adam Hancock, who coauthored a just-published study at East Carolina University.

The study looked at the credit-card-carrying habits of 400 college students. Two thirds of them carried one card, while about one third had more than one. But the number of cards didn’t necessarily predict the student’s debt level. Instead, the students who told researchers that their parents “usually argued about finances,” were three times more likely to have balances over $500 than those whose parents never quarreled about money.

[Read more…]

Daddy, why can’t you just get money out of one of those machines?

When my first child, who’s now 22, was less than a year old, I took her to an FAO Schwartz store in New York, thinking that she’d have a ball with all the toys and stuffies. But no matter what I pulled off the shelf, she was always far more interested in playing with the price tags than with the toy itself. Ten or 12 years later, I found it endlessly entertaining that she still had her obsession with price tags, saving up her clothing allowance to buy herself jeans  at $150/pair (I get mine at Costco for $12/pair and have never seen the point of paying much more than that). And in all the years in between, I can’t even count the number of times when she, presented with a “No, bunny, I don’t want to buy that right now,” would come back with, “Daddy, can’t you just get money from one of those machines?”
[Read more…]

All of Life’s Riches

Dear Mr. Dad: My wife and I are relatively well off and can give our kids whatever they want. But how can we be generous without spoiling them rotten?

A: First of all, change your perspective: think in terms of giving them what they need instead of what they want. That said, if by “generous” you mean giving your time and love to your children, there’s no need to limit your generosity. The kids will benefit from spending time with you and your wife (and you will too), whether you’re just hanging out, taking walks, talking, or doing something more structured–none of which needs to cost anything at all.

[Read more…]