Veterans’ Sexual Health + All You Need Is 4 Seconds

national alliance on mental health

Tom Berger and Ingrid Hererra-Yee
Veteran’s sexual health
Issues: How vets’ sexual health is affeted by PTSD; how a vet’s sexual issues affect his or her family; how the culture of the military keeps vets from asking for and getting the help they need; why asking for help is a sign of strength, not weakness; differences between the ways male and female vets deal with sexual issues; organizations that are working to help vets overcome obstacles
veterans health councilTom Berger is a U.S. Navy verteran and the Executive Director of the Veterans Health Council of the Vietnam Veterans of America.

national alliance on mental healthIngrid Hererra-Yee, LMHC, PhD, is a clinical psychologist who works with the National Alliance on Mental Illness. She was the 2014 National Guard Spouse of the Year, and is a specialist on trauma/PTSD.

Peter Bregman, author of Four Seconds.
All the time you need to stop counter-productive habits and get the results you want.
Issues: Why setting goals can harm your performance; how to use strategic disengagement to recover focus and willpower; why listening—not arguing—is the best strategy for changing someone’s mind; how taking responsibility for someone else’s failure can help you succeed.

A Personal History of ADHD

Timothy Denevi, author of Hyper.
A personal history of ADHD.
Issues: What it’s like to be a boy who can’t stop screaming or fighting or fidgeting; startling stats about ADHD (1/5 of high-school-age boys and 11 percent of all school-age children have been diagnosed with ADHD; the evolution of drug treatments; understanding this complex and controversial diagnosis.

Stop Blaming Parents and Start Dealing with Mental Illness

Dear Mr. Dad: I’m in shock about the Connecticut school shooting. I blame it on the parents of the killer. If they would have done a better job, including keeping their son away from guns, this whole thing might have been avoided. Why can’t we take children away from people like that and have them raised by truly loving parents?

A: Like you, I see the murder of 26 people as a terrible, terrible tragedy. But I disagree with the rest.

Adam Lanza was a loner had had few friends. But what makes you think his parents were unfit or didn’t love him? Over the next few months, we’ll have important national debates about parenting styles and gun control. I worry, though, that in our rush to find scapegoats, we’ll overlook a far bigger issue: Tens of thousands of parents struggle every day to raise children with severe mental illness.

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