What Every Child and Parent Needs to Know about Money, Investing, and the Markets

David Bianchi, author of Blue Chip Kids.
Topic:
What every child and parent should know about money, investing, and the stock market.
Issues: What is money? different ways of paying for things; the difference between stock markets and stock exchanges; stock options; funds; analyzing companies; borrowing money; net worth; taxes, and much more.

100 Lessons for Joey + Raising Kick-Ass Kids + Blue Chip Kids

08/21/15
R.J. Licata, author of 100 Lessons for Joey.
Topic:
100 things to teach your son (or daughter)
Issues: A collection of heartfelt advice on the importance of following one’s dreams and being a person of high character. This book is not only a loving tribute from a dad to his son, it is a thorough and timeless guide that will inspire a person of any age or walk of life to become the absolute best they can be. It serves as a reminder to us all that life is what we make it, and that there are no limits to our potential—except those we place on ourselves. Motivating and moving, “Lessons for Joey” will make you laugh, it will make you cry, and it will help you to realize that there is but one thing in this world more powerful than any other: love.

Robert Zeitlin, author of Laugh More, Yell Less.
Topic:
A guide to raising kick-ass kids.
Issues:Dr. Robert Zeitlin has dedicated the last 20 years to raising his kids, helping the children under his care, and working with parents to raise the children that the future needs. With his wife Betsy, Robert has raised two amazing teens who are kicking ass and taking names. Working in schools, with parents in his community, and through his clinical practice, Robert has maximized his background in Clinical Psychology to create family and school cultures that produce courageous leaders and communicators.

David Bianchi, author of Blue Chip Kids.
Topic:
What every child and parent should know about money, investing, and the stock market.
Issues: What is money? different ways of paying for things; the difference between stock markets and stock exchanges; stock options; funds; analyzing companies; borrowing money; net worth; taxes, and much more.

How the Financial Crisis Affects Our Health

money affects health

Dear Mr. Dad: The ongoing financial crisis has been really hard on my family. We haven’t had a family vacation in several years, we had to get rid of one of our cars, and my husband and I always seem to be getting angry at each other or at our children. It’s pretty obvious that all the stress about money has affected us emotionally, but could it be affecting us physically too?

A: Absolutely. Stress can damage your immune system, making your more susceptible to getting sick. It increases the risk of heart attack and stroke. And it can make people abuse drugs and alcohol, which in turn does all sorts of damage to the body—not to mention the damage that’s done to others when stressed out people cause car accidents, get into fights, or shoot each other.
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How Much Money Is Enough?

at-home ddad

Dear Mr. Dad: Right now, I work fulltime and my wife is home with our twin preschoolers. However, after some discussion, we realized that she’d prefer to be working and I’d rather be home with the kids. Where we run into challenges is that my wife feels she can’t support us on the same financial level we are at now. Does who stays home have to be a financial decision or, assuming we can make ends meet and pay our bills with my wife working and me at home, is there any reason for us not to do that?

A: What an interesting situation. In most families where dad is at home and mom is the primary breadwinner, the decision to reverse traditional gender roles was made because mom earns more than dad. In your case, though, you and your wife are making your decision based purely on what each of you would actually rather be doing. Congrats to both of you for having the courage to even entertain the idea.
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Daddy, why can’t you just get money out of one of those machines?

When my first child, who’s now 22, was less than a year old, I took her to an FAO Schwartz store in New York, thinking that she’d have a ball with all the toys and stuffies. But no matter what I pulled off the shelf, she was always far more interested in playing with the price tags than with the toy itself. Ten or 12 years later, I found it endlessly entertaining that she still had her obsession with price tags, saving up her clothing allowance to buy herself jeans  at $150/pair (I get mine at Costco for $12/pair and have never seen the point of paying much more than that). And in all the years in between, I can’t even count the number of times when she, presented with a “No, bunny, I don’t want to buy that right now,” would come back with, “Daddy, can’t you just get money from one of those machines?”
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