Science of Adult Attachment + Making Memories w/Grandchildren + Babies and Screens

Amir Levine, author of Attached.
Topic: The new science of adult attachment and how it can help you find—and keep—love.
Issues: Three attachment styles (anxious, avoidant, secure); understanding your own (and your child’s) attachment style; what happens when styles conflict? How secure attachment is essential not just for emotional well-being but for physical well-being as well.

Sue Johnson, coauthor, and Rick Johnson, illustrator Grandloving.Topic: Making memories with your grandchildren.
Issues: How grandparents provide stability and security for grandchildren; fun, inexpensive things to do with the grandkids; staying in touch over long distances; tips for grandparents caring for or raising grandchildren.

Lisa Guernsey, author of Into the Minds of Babes.
Topic: How screen time affects children from birth to age five.
Issues: Why the concerns about television causing ADHD are overblown; why interactivity is not all it’s cracked up to be; how baby videos may be doing more harm that good; the damage done by having a television going in the background.

Formula Feeding Your Baby without Fear

[amazon asin=B009S7O084&template=thumbnail&chan=default]Guest 1: Suzanne Barston, author of Bottled Up.

Topic: How the way we feed babies has come to define motherhood–and why it shouldn’t.

Issues: Breastfeeding rates are steadily rising in the US, but by three months after the birth, 64% of women are either supplementing with formula or have ceased to breastfeed completely; giving support and guidance for parents who feed their babies formula.

New dads’ post-partum depression is real–and ridiculed

Although this article from the Guardian talks mostly about reaction in the UK to a study showing that new dads may get postpartum depression, I’ve come across many of the Neanderthal attitudes expressed here in my work with fathers in the U.S.

What is your response to learning that there is a treatable but often undiagnosed medical condition that could mean that a baby is significantly more likely to require medical intervention for speech and language development? What if research had found the same condition led to the child being vastly more likely to develop behavioural problems and peer relationship problems? What if it could be affecting one in 30 newborn babies, or about 25,000 children every year in the UK alone, while minimal efforts are made to intervene?

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