How (Not) to Be a Husband + Creating Books For Middle Schoolers

Tim Dowling, author of How to Be a Husband.
Topic:
Exactly what not to do in every situation.
Issues: Forty guiding principles of gross marital happiness; twelve labors of marriage; how to become a relevant, productive member of your own family and household; intimate, embarrassing, and very funny stories that will resonate and delight.



George Hagen, author of Gabriel Finley & the Raven’s Riddle.
Topic:

Issues: Creating books for middle schoolers; riddles and puzzles, ravens, magic, mystery, family secrets, and redemption; childhood literary idols.

Indigo Kids + Getting to 50-50


Maureen Dawn Healy, author of Energetic Keys to Indigo Kids.
Topic:
Raising and resonating with today’s new children
Issues: Recognizing “indigo” children (highly sensitive, hyperactive, creative, but defiant); harnessing and redirecting that special indigo energy; triggers that set off bad behavior; why punishment may make problems worse.


Sharon Meers, coathor of Getting to 50/50.
Topic:
How working parents can have it all.
Issues: Why two careers are better than one; busting myths about work, women, and men; how your husband solves the work-life riddle; success doesn’t require 24/7; what women gain from working motherhood.

Biology Keeps Men from Having Sex with Best Friends’ Wives

In movies, books, and sometimes even real life, you often hear stories of men sleeping with their best friends’ wives. But in reality, that happens a lot less that you’d think. In fact, men may actually be biologically to stay away from the fruit of the forbidden tree (isn’t that poetic?). Researchers at the University […]

Breakthrough Solutions to Potty Problems + What Men Think About Marriage + Secrets of Happily Married Men

[amazon asin=076277360X&template=thumbnail1&chan=default]Guest 1: Steve Hodges, coauthor of It’s No Accident.
Topic: Breakthrough solutions to your child’s wetting, constipation, urinary tract infections, and other potty problems.
Issues: 30 percent of kids 2-10 are chronically constipated and 25 percent of 5-year olds have problems with accidents and bedwetting; how it is that most bed-wetting problems are actually the result of constipation; why toilet training kids too so can lead to wetting problems later; the dangers of holding it in.


[amazon asin=0743258738&template=thumbnail1&chan=default]Guest 2: Neil Chethik, author of Voicemale.
Topic: What husbands really think about their marriages, their wives, sex, housework, and commitment.
Issues: A unique look at men’s complex inner lives; men’s unique, masculine style of loving; what men are really looking for in the women they love.


[amazon asin=0787994146&template=thumbnail1&chan=default]Guest 3: Scott Haltzman, author of The Secrets Of Happily Married Men.
Topic: Eight ways men can win their wives hearts forever.
Issues: Eight ways men can win their wives hearts forever.
Issues: Identifying relationship challenges; how men can use their special strengths to improve relationships; overcoming gender stereotypes in marriage.

Bite Your Tongue. Hard. Please.

Dear Mr. Dad: My mother-in-law has an opinion on every conceivable parenting topic. The problem is that those opinions are usually unwelcome and unhelpful. Besides that, every time she’s at my house, she insists on telling me (and my wife when she’s there) how we should raise our children. What can I do before I snap?

A: I know this is going to hurt, but try to think about things from her perspective. Like every other human being, your mother-in-law has a wide variety of life experiences. But does she have any reason to feel that her advice is better than anyone else’s? If, for example, she is or was a child psychologist or a professional in another parenting-related field, she may feel that her training and experience make her advice especially unique and important.

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Communicating With Your Spouse

Ever since our baby was born, it seems like my wife and I are growing apart from each other. We hardly even talk anymore. She’s a stay-at-home mom, and I work a lot. We used to be great at communication, talking to each other about our days, discussing our child and what she is learning. I’m afraid our relationship isn’t as strong as it used to be. What happened?

Nearly all new parents experience a drop in the quality of their communication. Half the time it’s permanent. Here are some of the factors that researchers have found contribute to this decline in couples’ communication skills:
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