Essential Cancer Prevention Tips for Men

Cancer. Just the name sparks fear in the hearts of men all around the world. Whether you’re talking about lung cancer, prostate cancer, stomach cancer, esophageal cancer, or any of the other numerous forms, cancer is frightening and too often deadly. However, it doesn’t have to get you. While genetic predisposition certainly plays a role in whether you develop cancer or not, there are numerous things that you can do to prevent it.

  1. Stop Using Tobacco

If there is one absolutely must-do step you can take to prevent cancer, it’s kicking tobacco out of your life. Tobacco in any form (including cigarettes, cigars, pipes and chewing tobacco) is a cancer causing substance. Lung, throat, and mouth cancer are just for starters. If you can’t quit smoking, consider switching to an electronic cigarette or other smoking substitute (although be aware: e-cigs have plenty of health risks too). It’s not the nicotine that will kill you. It’s the tobacco.

  1. Take Steps to Prevent Cancer-Contributing Infections

CANCERCancer doesn’t come only from radiation and smoking. In fact, a number of infections can actually contribute to the likelihood that you’ll develop cancer. HIV, hepatitis, and HPV are just three of the viruses that may increase your chances of also developing cancer.

  1. Watch What You Eat

What you eat is important for energy, health, and weight considerations, but it’s also important for cancer prevention. A number of foods can make you more susceptible to cancer, including grilled meats, red meat, and salty foods. By extension, anything that adds pounds to your frame could also be considered a cancer encourager, since being obese also increases your cancer risk.  If you’re overweight or obese, take steps to shed those pounds now.

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Healthy Eating Tips for Every Age and Stage of Development

mrdad - good eating habits

mrdad - good eating habits

Dads, listen up: Child obesity is out of control. Don’t let your child fall victim to this epidemic that affects nearly one in three children in America. What your children put in their bodies aids their mental and physical development. Begin feeding your kids nutritious food from day one and adjust to their needs during different life stages. Here are some healthy eating tips to implement in every stage of your child’s life.

Newborns

Breast milk is the best food for babies. It provides all the beneficial nutrients, according to the American Association of Pediatrics, which recommends exclusive breastfeeding until six months and a combination of breast milk and iron-rich complementary foods thereafter.

Not only does breastfeeding promote a deeper connection with between mom and baby, breast milk aids in protection from respiratory illnesses, infections, stomach problems, skin irritations and allergies.

New fathers can build their bond with baby by feeding breast milk from a bottle after mom’s milk supply is established (at about two to four weeks). Here’s the best approach:

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Superfoods for babies and toddlers

Dana Angelo White, author of First Bites.
Topic:
Superfoods for babies and toddlers.
Issues: Defining superfoods; what growing bodies need; what they don’t need; simple recipes that emphasize fruits and vegetables, grains, protein, dairy, and eggs; getting kids to make good food choices on tier own.

Family Travel and Adventure + First Bites

travel & adventure showJohn Golicz, CEO of UNICOMM, which produces Travel & Adventure Shows. travelshows.com.
Topic:
Travel & Adventure shows.
Issues: Travel options for families, couples, and singles; budget and luxury travel options; domestic and international travel destinations.

peter greenbergPeter Greenberg, Travel Editor, CBS News and petergreenberg.com
Topic:
Family Travel.
Issues: Preparing for a trip; being smart about food safety; should you buy travel insurance? The secret to breezing through airport security; biggest mistakes families make when traveling;

Dana Angelo White, author of First Bites.
Topic:
Superfoods for babies and toddlers.
Issues: Defining superfoods; what growing bodies need; what they don’t need; simple recipes that emphasize fruits and vegetables, grains, protein, dairy, and eggs; getting kids to make good food choices on tier own.

Finally! Science Proves That Pizza is Good for You

Pizza contributes to higher calorie, saturated fat and sodium intake in children’s and teens’ diets. And as the second largest contributor to calorie and nutrient intake in children’s diets, its impact on maintaining healthy weight is important. The authors of the study, “Energy and Nutrient Intake from Pizza in the United States,” appearing in the February 2015 issue of Pediatrics, (published online Jan. 19) examined dietary recall data from a period of several years for children age 2 to 11 and teens aged 12 to 19. On the days pizza is consumed, it makes up more than 20 percent of the daily intake of calories. Plus, overall calorie intake for that day is much higher. Since dietary counseling is more effective if focused on specific foods, rather than overall nutrients, and pizza plays a prominent role in children’s overall diet, the authors suggest that pizza be directly addressed in nutrition counseling. And because pizza is available from multiple sources (restaurants, fast food, stores and schools), efforts should focus on improving nutritional content and marketing.

Color Me Healthy, Kiddo

Dear Mr. Dad: It seems like every meal in my house is a battle. I try to make healthy, tasty foods and my kids do nothing but complain about it. It seems like all they want to eat is white rice and plain pasta. Why won’t they eat anything else, and what can I do to get them to expand their preferences?

A: Ah, yes, the white food group. I remember it well. Besides rice and pasta, my two oldest kids were flexible enough to include French fries (or, sometimes, a baked potato with sour cream), cheese pizza, fish sticks, and salt. Lots of salt. For a while, I was worried that their limited diet would stunt their growth, but they’re both 5’ 7,” and incredibly healthy. When I think about it, they did eat non-white foods too: peas and carrots were okay (as long as they weren’t touching on the plate), tomatoes (cleverly disguised as pasta sauce), vitamins (in milk), lots of fruit, and even some protein (often fish sticks or chicken nuggets). I’m sure your children’s culinary repertoire is broader than you think. That said, I know I could have done a better job.
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