The Happy Sleeper + Building Resilience

Julie Wright, co-author of The Happy Sleeper.
Topic:
A science-backed guide to helping your baby get a good night’s sleep
Issues: Babies already know how to sleep—parents don’t need to “train” them; how to be sensitive and nurturing, but also clear and structured so babies and young children can develop the skills to self-soothe, fall asleep independently, through the night, take healthy naps, develop natural sleep patterns for day and night.

Kenneth Ginsburg, author of Building Resilience in Children and Teens.
Topic:
Giving kids roots and wings
Issues: The effects of stress and how to foster resilience; grit: the character trait that drives performance; building competence and confidence; the importance of connection, character, and contribution; coping with difficulties and taking care of oneself; increasing kids’ sense of control and independence.

The Write Stuff

Dear Mr. Dad: I’ve been reading your columns for quite a few years, and you frequently talk about how important it is to read to children. With all the emphasis on literacy, I think we’re forgetting about writing. When I was in school, we had classes in penmanship, but my preschooler and kindergartener aren’t learning it at all. Is writing even necessary anymore?

A: In a word, absolutely. Not all that long ago, we used to talk about the “Three Rs”: reading, (w)riting, and (a)rithmetic—the fundamental skills taught in school (I know, not a very good lesson in spelling, but catchier than saying “The R, the W, and the A”). But, as you’ve noticed, the second R (writing) has pretty much fallen by the wayside—in fact, over the past few years, schools all around the country have stopped teaching cursive altogether, and a growing number of children are doing their homework, including writing papers and essays, online.

According to a new study, the percentage of children using tablets has doubled in the past two years alone, and now includes 75% of children under eight and nearly 40% of kids under two. Some people say that with all that technology, there’s no need for kids to learn how to write at all—it’s a lot easier to just use a tablet or other device. I can see the point. And I get that typed assignments are a lot easier for teachers to read. But, at the risk of sounding a little old-fashioned, I think writing is a very important skill—and there’s getting to be a lot of research that backs me up.
[Read more…]

The Art of Schmoozing

Alaina G. Levine, author of Networking for Nerds.
Topic:
Find, access, and land hidden game-changing career opportunities everywhere
Issues: How and why we should connect with others; overcoming shyness (our own—and helping our kids overcome theirs, too); how to start—and end—conversations with others (and how to give our kids the skills to do the same).

Building a Family That Thrives + Networking for Nerds

Elly Taylor, author of Becoming Us.
Topic:
Growing a family that thrives.
Issues: How to prepare for parenthood before actually becoming a parent; build a nest; managing expectations; knowing and understanding your family’s needs; expand your emotional intelligence; connecting and reconnecting with your partner through intimacy.

Alaina G. Levine, author of Networking for Nerds.
Topic:
Find, access, and land hidden game-changing career opportunities everywhere
Issues: How and why we should connect with others; overcoming shyness (our own—and helping our kids overcome theirs, too); how to start—and end—conversations with others (and how to give our kids the skills to do the same).

Navigating Early Development in Today’s Girls

Louise Greenspan and Juliana Deardorff, co-authors of The New Puberty.
Topic:
How to navigate early development in today’s girls.
Issues: Why girls are developing earlier and what it means for their long-term health; things that can trigger early puberty (excess body fat, hormone-mimicing chemicals, emotional stressors at home); strategies to help prevent and/or manage early puberty.

Employed and At-Home Moms + The New Puberty


Deborah Kahn, author of The Roads Taken.
Topic:
Complex lives of employed and at-home mothers.
Issues: Is there an ideal work status? why do mothers change–or not change–their work status? can we really have it all? who gives us support? advantages and disadvantage of working or being at home; where do we go from here?

Louise Greenspan and Juliana Deardorff, co-authors of The New Puberty.
Topic:
How to navigate early development in today’s girls.
Issues: Why girls are developing earlier and what it means for their long-term health; things that can trigger early puberty (excess body fat, hormone-mimicing chemicals, emotional stressors at home); strategies to help prevent and/or manage early puberty.