The Gold Standard of Childcare + Redirecting Our Personal Narratives

Tammy Gold, author of Secrets of the Nanny Whisperer.
Topic:
Finding and achieving the gold standard of care for your child.
Issues: The truth about nannies—what they do and how they think; identifying your family’s needs; conducting interviews, reference checks, trial periods, and work agreements; understanding “nanny speak”; troubleshooting to avoid drama, resolve problems, and handle any issues.



Timothy Wilson, author of Redirect.
Topic:
Changing the stories we live by.
Issues: Why so many self-help programs, drug use prevention programs; teen pregnancy prevention programs, and crime reduction programs (like “scared straight”), don’t work—and may even do more harm than good; how, by making small changes to the narratives we tell ourselves, we can create lasting, positive change.

Food, Fun, and Conversation for a Happy Family

Anne Fishel, author of Home for Dinner.
Topic:
Mixing food, fun, and conversation for a happier family and healthier kids.
Issues: Overcoming time-constraints, scheduling issues, and post-work fatigue; bringing gratitude to the table and averting complaints and conflict; the importance of conversation; getting the whole family talking, laughing, and engaging with one another—and keeping it up over time.

Mindful Parenting + Home for Dinner

Myla and Jon Kabat-Zinn, co-authors of Everyday Blessings.
Topic:
The inner work of mindful parenting.
Issues: What is mindfulness? Using mindfulness approaches to become a better parent; learning to respond to our children with greater wisdom and compassion.

Anne Fishel, author of Home for Dinner.
Topic:
Mixing food, fun, and conversation for a happier family and healthier kids.
Issues: Overcoming time-constraints, scheduling issues, and post-work fatigue; bringing gratitude to the table and averting complaints and conflict; the importance of conversation; getting the whole family talking, laughing, and engaging with one another—and keeping it up over time.

Family Cooking Adventures Every Week

Jennifer Tyler Lee, author of The 52 New Foods Challenge.
Topic:
A family cooking adventure for each week of the year.
Issues: Creative ways to get your children to eat healthy, balanced meals; practical tips to change the way your family eats—one new food at a time; bringing back the joy of mealtimes; exploring new foods and bust boredom at your family table.

Evil Stepmother Speaks + 52 New Foods Challenge

Barbara Goldberg, author of The Evil Stepmother Speaks.
Topic:
A guide for stepfamilies who want to love and laugh
Issues: Why doesn’t anyone in the stepfamily listen to me? Why doesn’t the biological parents see what I see? Why am I so frustrated? And many other questions stepmothers ask.

Jennifer Tyler Lee, author of The 52 New Foods Challenge.
Topic:
A family cooking adventure for each week of the year.
Issues: Creative ways to get your children to eat healthy, balanced meals; practical tips to change the way your family eats—one new food at a time; bringing back the joy of mealtimes; exploring new foods and bust boredom at your family table.

Becoming the Model Parent

Dear Mr. Dad: People are constantly talking about how parents should be good role models for their kids, and that makes good sense to me. But everywhere I look, I see parents behaving in horrible ways. Maybe I’m confused about what “good role model” really means. What are good role models supposed to do?

A: We all know that our kids are watching our every move (even when they’re ignoring us). And most of us have banished the phrase “do as I say, not as I do” from our vocabulary. So there’s no question that what we do is important and that our behavior can have a big influence on how our children will turn out as adults. But for me, setting a good example is much more about the being than the doing.

If you want your child to be an ethical person, treat others (and themselves) with respect, and make the right choices even if they’re not the easy ones, you’ll have to do more than demonstrate behavior. You’ll have to talk about the issues and point out examples of good—and bad—behavior around you, and in movies, TV shows, and books. And you’ll need to discuss with your child why people make the choices they do and what your child would have done instead. The goal is to lead your child to a point where he or she will make good choices even when you’re not there.

That said, being a role model isn’t all in your head, and how you behave is still important. Here are a few ideas:
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