When Kids Call the Shots + Rookie Moms


Sean Grover, author of When Kids Call the Shots.
Topic:
How to seize control from your darling bully and enjoy being a parent again.
Issues: Understanding the root causes of your child’s bossy behavior; how your own insecurities and history have shaped your parenting choices; types of parents who are more susceptible to being bullied by their kids; three most common bullying styles that kids use–and strategies you can use to restore your leadership.

Heather Flett, coauthor of The Rookie Mom’s Handbook.
Topic:
Motherhood, fatherhood, the changing landscape of parenthood.
Issues: How motherhood has changed over the last 10 years; the mom blogging community; resources for new moms; the importance of letting the dad do things his way; the role of social media in creating communities of moms.

Dog and Babies

baby and dog

baby and dogDear Mr. Dad: I’m pregnant with our first child and I’m due in about four moinths. One of the things I’m worried about is our dog, a 150-pound male mastiff, who is truly a part of our family and not just a pet. Some friends of ours say that it’s dangerous to have a giant dog around a newborn and that we should start looking for a new home for him. Is it? And is there some way to prepare our dog and keep our baby safe?

A: There’s no way to predict with 100 percent accuracy how animals are going to react in any given situation, but you can get some hints by asking yourself these questions: What is the dog’s personality? Is he aggressive or territorial? Does he growl or bite? Does he jump on you, the furniture, or guests? Has he spent time with children? Does he like children? How protective is he of his toys? Could he possibly confuse a neatly wrapped up baby with a chewable toy? Does he bark when he wants attention? Does he understand and obey basic commands? I’m sure you can figure out which questions need a Yes answer and which need a No.

But no matter how wonderful your dog is, there’s always some risk. According to Michael Wombacher, author of “Good Dog, Happy Baby,” of the 4.7 million people who get bitten by dogs in the U.S. every year, 80 percent are children under five. Eighty percent of those bites are to the face and happen during feeding, petting, or playing. Most of those dogs live in the victim’s home and have no history of biting.

[Read more…]

Dancing with Your Baby + Love’s Promises


Sue Doherty, author of Dancing with Your Baby.
Topic:
Bonding and better health for you and your baby.
Issues: How touch, music, and movement benefit your baby; the ideal time to introduce your baby to music (hint: it’s before birth) and dance; how dancing with your baby benefits you.
 

 

Martha Ertman, author of Love’s Promises.
Topic:
How formal and informal contracts shape all kinds of families.
Issues: The difference between a “deal” (I cook dinner and you wash the dishes) and an enforceable contract; Type A families (heterosexual couple raising a biologically related child) vs. Type B families (pretty much every other kind of family imaginable); how contracts shape and sustain families as opposed to simply being cold and calculating.

Preparing Your Dog for Your Baby + Raising Friends for Life


Michael Wombacher, author of Good Dog, Happy Baby.
Topic:
Preparing your dog for the arrival of your child.
Issues: How to evaluate your dog and identify potential problems before the baby arrivers; how to resolve common behavioral problems such as barking object guarding, jumping up, overprotectiveness, and more; how to be sure your dog understands his place in the pack; teach your dog to build positive associations with the baby.


Laura Markham, author of Peaceful Parents, Happy Siblings.
Topic:
How to stop the fighting and raise friends for life.
Issues: The most common mistake parents make with siblings; why you shouldn’t force your kids to share; how and why to schedule meltdowns; ways to foster sibling bonding; when to intervene in a sibling fight; should you force your kids to apologize to each other after a fight?

Biting and Hitting the Hand that Feeds

biting teeth
biting teeth

Photo credit: gigabiting.com

Dear Mr. Dad: Our son just turned one and, almost like flipping a switch, he went from the sweetest, happiest little guy to smacking and biting. It’s bad enough when it happens at home, but my husband and I are beyond embarrassed when he attacks friends or strangers. Is it normal for babies to turn mean like this? Normal or not, how can we get it to stop?

A: No one knows exactly why, but right around their first birthday, most babies go through a stage that involves hitting and/or biting everything and everyone in sight. So, yes, biting and hitting are normal, and it’s unlikely that he’s “turning mean.” However, as you said, whether it’s normal or not, this behavior needs to stop. Before you can do anything about the behavior, though, you need to figure out what’s behind it.

According to child development experts, there are lots of possible explanations. Your baby may be hitting or biting because: [Read more…]

Happy Father’s Day to Two Men with Over 1.5 Million Babies  

Former Viagra colleagues, ex-Team Leader, Rooney Nelson and fellow team member Dr. Sal Giorgianni did the preliminary analysis, and the findings are in. “We were thinking about how the real measurement of Viagra’s success was not really intimacy, but its ability to help couples in the creation of life,” said Nelson, also founder of the Nelson Group. “So we ran the numbers.”

The analysis was done using a linear assessment model comprised of data from the CDC, US Census, National Out-Patient and Birth Data, along with IMS Share and Market penetration data. The figures showed that Viagra was a contributingn factor in at least 6% of the approximately 3.9 million annual births in the U.S. over the last 18 years, resulting in at least 1.5 million babies to date, and counting…. in the U.S. alone.

“When you think about it, you can’t help but be humbled,” says Dr. Sal Giorgianni, who led the medical relations outreach efforts for Viagra’s launch team. “To know that the work of you and your colleagues did helped in the births of over 1.5 million babies is amazing. That’s a benchmark that may never be equaled.”

“That’s why we’ve launched the IMPACT Project,” adds Rooney Nelson. “To help others gain the tools to be successful.” The IMPACT Project is a 2-3 hour workshop where both Nelson and Giorgianni reveal the team-building strategies they used to create the successful launch and future success of Viagra. It also gives back to the community by having the participants engage in team building exercises where they work together to create care packages for at-risk children.

“No other team-building activity can match this program’s ability to inspire, motivate, and provide team members with a proven blueprint for future success,” says Nelson. “Working in any industry requires collaboration and coordination across various functions,” adds Giorgianni. “With Viagra, as with many other products today, especially in the pharmaceutical, life sciences, and tech industries, there are no models to follow. This initiative is so exciting because we get to share our proven insights and intelligence with other companies and brands that are focused on making a positive difference.”

About the IMPACT Project
The IMPACT Project, presented by The Nelson Group, is available to all companies and teams that aspire to be successful. Workshops typically last two to three hours. Group range in size from 5 to over 5,000 paraticipants.

About the Nelson Group
Based in New York City, the Nelson Group was founded in 2002 by Rooney Nelson, who, before leavingn Pfizer had served in many senior management positions, including U.S. Team Leader for Viagra.  TNG has conducted more than 1,000 meetings worldwide. Clients include many of the world’s premier brands.

For more information please visit www.welcometotng or call 646.838.2230.