True Strength is Strength Under Control

A guest post from HearDad.com 

It doesn’t take long for a father to be at his wits end with a toddler. Shorter still when the toddler naturally resists falling asleep, staying asleep, and going back to sleep. I can confidently presume that you’ve been where I frequently am. At the end of your rope. So close to giving up or lashing out that you often wonder if you’re the only one who has too much testosterone pulsing through your veins. I have great news for you. You’re not alone and your struggle is not hopeless.

Someone once said that true strength was strength under control. The more I mature in fatherhood the more this truth becomes apparent to me. All over the news you see, read and hear of another man or adolescent that snaps. They unleash all of their frustration, all of their anger, all of their supposed strength on a helpless child. Most often, this undeserving attack ends in death but can also end in permanent damage. It is absolutely never worth it. To anyone. Yet it keeps happening. Someone eventually snaps.

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Breakthrough Results for Children with Autism, Brain Damage, Developmental Delays


Anat Baniel, author of Kids Beyond Limits.
Topic: Breakthrough results for children with autism, Asperger’s, brain damage, ADHD, and undiagnosed developmental delays.
Issues: The need to shift to connecting with the child rather than fixing him/her; nine steps to improve the child’s brain, which will produce remarkable—and sometimes immediate—results; harnessing the brain’s capacity to heal itself; how parents can incorporate the nine steps into everyday life.

Spotlight on Minority Men’s Health

As many of us know, minorities (in particular African Americans and Hispanics) generally have worse health outcomes than Whites. But what most people don’t know is that minority men have far worse health outcomes than minority women. It’s a crisis that deserves our attention.

Dr. Jean Bonhomme is an expert on minority health and he’s got a wonderful piece on this topic on the Talking About Men’s Health blog. Read it here.

For more information on the health of men, boys, and those who love them, visit Men’s Health Network.

Kids Beyond Limits + 1001 Things to Love about the Military


Anat Baniel, author of Kids Beyond Limits.
Topic: Breakthrough results for children with autism, Asperger’s, brain damage, ADHD, and undiagnosed developmental delays.
Issues: The need to shift to connecting with the child rather than fixing him/her; nine steps to improve the child’s brain, which will produce remarkable—and sometimes immediate—results; harnessing the brain’s capacity to heal itself; how parents can incorporate the nine steps into everyday life.


Star Henderson, author of 1001 Things to Love about the Military and co-founder of Army Wife Network
Topic: A celebration of military life.
Issues: Obvious and not-so-obvious traditions, advantages and experiences military members, veterans and their families share. Includes resources military brats and their parents should know about, along with fun “You know you are a military brat when…” and “You know you are a military parent when…” lists.

Building a Childhood

Kids and building go hand in hand: Make it bigger, higher, better, greener—whatever strikes their fancy that particular day. Not only are building toys a good time, but they‘re also great for parent-child bonding, and have been shown to improve motor skills, hand-eye coordination, social skills, cooperation, creativity, spatial skills, and more. No wonder we love ‘em so much!

play doh minionsPlay-Doh Disguise Lab Featuring Despicable Me Minions (Hasbro)
Sometimes we all feel like minions. But what do minions do when they want to feel like someone else? Enter Play-Dough Disguise Lab. Just put your minion into the hair styling chair (one purple minion, one yellow minion, and chair are included) and give him as many silly and crazy hairstyles as you’d like. Your child will have so much fun with this, and you will too. You can trim their hair, choose different colors, and even make things that Minions love like ba-na-nas. The kit also comes with scissors (not sharp), a comb for styling, and four cans of Play-Doh. With the Minion movie coming out this summer, this Play Doh kit will be even more popular. About $18 at Toys R Us and other retailers.

 

 

 

lego batman penguin3 LEGO DC Comics Batman: The Penguin Face off
LEGO, of course, are great building toys. With a dizzying number of sets and sizes to choose from, there’s something for every kid (and every parent) to play with. “LEGO DC Comics Batman: The Penguin Face” off lets kids recreate and act out their favorite superhero moments. In this kit, the goal is to help Scuba Batman bring justice to that diamond-stealing, umbrella-wielding waddler, Penguin and his minions (no, not the yellow ones—this villain’s minions are robot penguins). The kit comes with Batman and Penguin (and two minions) mini-figs, the “diamond,” a ton of weapons—including Penguin’s umbrella, and all the ingredients to build Batman’s scuba vehicle and Penguin’s duck boat. Penguin and the duck boat appeared in the recent movie “LEGO DC Comics Super Heroes: Justice League vs. Bizarro League.” The title is quite a mouthful, but it was pretty funny, and a good flick for the whole family (especially all those LEGO and/or Superheroes fans). If your child isn’t into superheroes and prefers something a little more “real,” take a look at the Swamp Police Starter Set, which comes with four mini-figs, an alligator, boat, raft, “hideout” spot, and quite a few accessories, including a spider, snake, handcuffs, walkie talkies, a shovel, and more. Ages 5-12. Batman is about $13, Swamp is about $10. http://shop.lego.com.

bun bunBun Bun! (The Bridge Direct)
If you think that all building toys have to be blocks or bricks and have hard edges, you need to meet Bun Bun. These cute, cuddly (and collectible, of course) animals were created to be stacked and piled up. Stacking plush toys have already created a splash in Japan and other countries, and they’re just now hitting the US markets. Bun Bun combines two things kids love: building and animals which is great. Better yet, both boys and girls we tested Bun Bun with loved them and couldn’t get enough. The first wave of characters includes Kit Kit (Cat), Moo Moo (Cow), Pup Pup (Dog), Shu Shu (Monkey), Bit Bit (Mouse), Pip Pip (Pig), Bai Bai (Polar Bear), and Bon Bon (Rabbit), and they come in four sizes: mini (4”) small (7”) medium (10”) jumbo (16”). But regardless of the color, size, or animal, Bun Bun encourages kids to be creative and get their engineering on. For all ages. Prices range from $5 to $20. http://www.bunbuntoys.com/