Author: Armin

Sometimes You Don’t Need Batteries. Other Times, You Definitely Do.

Here’s some of the latest in family tech. VR Real Feel Racing Now you can get the full virtual-reality experience of car racing without having to leave the comfort of your living room. The app itself is a lot of fun for both kids and adults who like racing games. But what’s especially cool about Real Feel Racing is that in addition to the very-comfortable headset, you also get a steering wheel. Most other VR racing setups have you tilt your head to steer. That’s fun, but you don’t have any control over acceleration or braking. With Real Feel,...

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My Baby Doesn’t Like Her Daddy

Dear Mr. Dad: My husband and I have a 2-year old daughter and we’ve both been very involved in raising her. But recently, she’s started pushing him away and demanding that I do everything. She won’t let him read her bedtime stories, take her to the park, feed her, get her dressed, or anything else—all things that he’s always done and, until a few weeks ago, she had no complaints about. This is quite frustrating for two reasons. First, I see how much it hurts my husband and I can’t seem to help him. Second, our daughter’s constant demands...

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How @Netflix Helps Us Talk with our Kids about Tough Stuff

As parents, we instinctively want to protect our children from everything bad that could possibly happen. But no matter how much we try, they still have worries and fears. Lots of them. One common approach to dealing with our children’s fears is to ignore or minimize their feelings with well-meaning pats on the head and assurances that nothing bad will ever happen and that we’ll always be there to protect them. Part of that approach involves sanitizing the media—books, movies, and so on—that our children are exposed to. The result is a huge proliferation of fluffy bunnies, unicorns who...

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The Kindness Challenge + Breathe, Mama, Breathe

Interview with Shaunti Feldhahn, author of “The Kindness Challenge,” about three simple acts that make a huge difference in any relationship in 30 days; and with Shonda Moralis, author of “Breathe, Mama, Breathe,” about 5-minute mindfulness for busy moms.

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Build it up and Knock it Down

Building things—whether it’s a 3D puzzle, a metal replica of a pirate ship, a mini model of the Millennium Falcon, or a tower out of plain wooden blocks—is one of the best ways to spend time with your children. But half of the fun of building something is knocking it down. Here are some of our new favorites to build and smash (plus a few others). Build or Boom (Proto Toys) Like a lot of games these days, this one starts with a card. In this case, it’s a two-sided one that has a picture of a structure that...

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The Reflective Parent + The Happiest Mommy You Know

Interviews with Regina Pally, author of “The Reflective Parent,” about how to do less and relate more with your kids; and with Genevieve Shaw Brown, author of “The Happiest Mommy You Know,” about why putting your kids first is the last thing you should do.

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Seeing Science in the Eye of the Beholder

With everyone talking about STEM these days, we here at Parents@Play are always on the lookout for great science-themed toys, games, and activities. Here are four that focus on vision that you and your family will love. Amusin’ Illusions (Scientific Explorer) Optical illusions are always entertaining to play with, but haven’t you ever wondered how and why they work? How do 3D glasses get images to pop off the screen (or page)? Why do certain patterns seem to move even when we know they’re not? How does water make objects look like they’re bent? With this fun, educational kit...

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Having the Talk—No, Not That One, the One about Money

Dear Mr. Dad: My parents never talked with me and my siblings about money, but I’m feeling the need to give my kids—ages 4 and 7—a better financial education than I got. When’s the right time to start? A: What is it about money that no one wants to talk about it? Drugs, sex, and violence are perfectly acceptable dinnertime fare, but we’re almost embarrassed to discuss something that we use every single day of our life. How much we make and where that money goes after the government gets its share is nobody’s business but our own (and,...

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